Healthy Keto Micronutrients, Vitamins and Minerals You Need on a Ketogenic Diet

Healthy Keto Micronutrients, Vitamins and Minerals You Need on a Ketogenic Diet

The Importance of Micronutrients, Vitamins, and Minerals on a Keto Diet

When you follow a ketogenic diet, your body produces ketones as its primary source of energy. This is because when you restrict your carbohydrate intake, your body needs to find an alternative source of energy. On a ketogenic diet, your body produces fat-burning enzymes called ketones. To support your new fat-burning lifestyle, it is important to recognize the micronutrients that are found in abundance on a ketogenic diet and those that must be supplemented from outside sources.

Micronutrients on a Ketogenic Diet

On a ketogenic diet, your primary source of energy is fat. Because of this, micronutrients that are naturally found in high amounts in fat are easily and efficiently absorbed by your body.

  • Vitamin A – Vitamin A is found in high amounts in both animal fats and cod liver oil. It is important for vision, bone growth, immune function, and reproduction. Vitamin A deficiency can lead to night blindness, poor immunity, and poor reproduction.
  • Vitamin B – Vitamin B is a group of vitamins found in protein-rich foods. This includes both animal and plant foods. Vitamin B is important for the creation of red blood cells, neurotransmitter function, and proper muscle and brain function. Deficiencies in Vitamin B can lead to fatigue, anemia, depression and mood disorders, anxiety, and cognitive impairment.
  • Vitamin C – Vitamin C is found in high amounts in both fruits and vegetables. It is important for collagen formation, immune function, iron absorption, and prevention of oxidative stress. Deficiencies in Vitamin C can lead to fatigue, poor wound healing, bleeding gums, iron deficiency, and reduced immune function.
  • Vitamin D – Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is important for healthy bone formation, immune function, and mood regulation. Vitamin D is most commonly associated with its role in bone health, but it has a number of other important functions, too. In fact, Vitamin D is so essential for human health that it’s been called “the most important micronutrient for good health.”
  • Vitamin E – Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin that is found in high amounts in both nuts and seeds. It is important for creation of red blood cells, cellular health, and healing of damaged tissues. Deficiencies in Vitamin E can lead to an increase in oxidative stress.

Calcium

Calcium is important for bone health and nervous system function. On a ketogenic diet, calcium may be absorbed less efficiently because of an increase in uric acid from increased protein intake. To compensate for this, you should consume more calcium-rich foods and supplement with a calcium citrate supplement.

  • Dairy Products – Dairy products are a great source of calcium. Dairy products are allowed on most ketogenic diets, but you should watch your portion sizes to prevent overconsumption of protein and extra calories.
  • Fish with Soft Bones – Fish with soft bones, including sardines, salmon, and canned tuna, are a great source of calcium. Be careful to not consume too much fish bones, as they can cause constipation.
  • Leafy Greens – Leafy greens, including broccoli, salmon, and kale, are rich in calcium. Be careful, however, as many contain oxalates that bind to calcium and prevent its absorption.

Iron

Iron is important for red blood cell formation and cognitive function. Iron is absorbed better when ingested with Vitamin C and Zinc. On a ketogenic diet, you may need to supplement with extra iron if you are menstruating.

  • Red Meat – Red meat is the richest source of iron. If you have gout, iron-induced uric acid may cause you flare-ups.
  • Beans and Legumes – Beans and legumes, including black beans, kidney beans, and lentils, are a great source of iron. Beans are also a great source of fibre, which is important for digestive health.
  • Dark Leafy Greens – Dark leafy greens, including spinach and chard, are a great source of iron. Be careful, however, as many contain oxalates that bind to iron and prevent its absorption.

Magnesium

Magnesium is important for nerve and muscle function. On a ketogenic diet, you may need to supplement with extra magnesium as it may be excreted in the urine.

  • Green Vegetables – Green vegetables, including broccoli, spinach, and asparagus, are a great source of magnesium. Be careful, however, as many contain oxalates that bind to magnesium and prevent its absorption.
  • Nuts and Seeds – Nuts and seeds, including almonds, cashews, and pumpkin seeds, are a great source of magnesium.
  • Dark Chocolate – Dark chocolate is a rich source of magnesium. Be careful not to overdo it, however, as it also contains lots of added sugar.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is important for healthy bone formation, immune function, and mood regulation. Vitamin D is most commonly associated with its role in bone health, but it has a number of other important functions, too. In fact, Vitamin D is so essential for human health that it’s been called “the most important micronutrient for good health.”

Although your body can naturally produce Vitamin D when your skin is exposed to sunlight, many people do not get enough sunlight to make enough Vitamin D. This is especially true during the winter months when people are indoors more often.

If you follow a ketogenic diet, your carbohydrate intake is restricted, which may decrease your Vitamin D production. To compensate for this, you should strive to get more sunlight, eat more Vitamin D-rich foods, and supplement with a Vitamin D supplement if you do not get enough sun exposure.

Potassium

Potassium is important for normal heart function. On a ketogenic diet, potassium may be excreted in the uric acid. To compensate for this, you should strive to consume more potassium-rich foods and supplement with a potassium citrate supplement. – Avocados – Avocados are a great source of potassium and fat. Be careful not to overdo it, however, as avocados are also high in calories.

Conclusion

On a ketogenic diet, your primary source of energy is fat. Fat is also a primary source of many micronutrients, including Vitamin A, Vitamin E, and Vitamin D. Because fat is easily and efficiently absorbed by the body, it is important to consume a diet rich in healthy fats and consider supplementing with a calcium citrate, iron, and magnesium supplement.

If you follow a ketogenic diet, be sure to remember that your body’s primary source of energy is fat. That means that micronutrients found in high amounts in fat are easily and efficiently absorbed by your body. While following a ketogenic diet, be sure to consume plenty of healthy fats, such as avocado, coconut oil, fish, nuts, seeds, and olive oil.

 

 

How to Reduce Cholesterol on a Ketogenic Diet

How to Reduce Cholesterol on a Ketogenic Diet

Reducing Cholesterol on a Ketogenic Diet

‍Are you eating a ketogenic diet but worried about your cholesterol? If so, you’re not alone. Many people are concerned about their cholesterol when they start a ketogenic diet.

But rest assured; as long as you track your macros and stay within the recommended range, this diet is safe and healthy for most people. Eating a high-fat, low-carb diet can improve your lipid profile by lowering triglycerides and raising HDL (the good) cholesterol.

However, these changes might take time to show up on your lab tests. Meanwhile, in the first few weeks of this diet, you may experience side effects like weakness, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting called keto flu.

These are usually temporary symptoms that resolve as your body adjusts to fat being the primary source of calories instead of carbohydrates. To learn more about how to reduce cholesterol on a ketogenic diet read on!

What’s the Ideal Cholesterol Range?

It’s recommended to have total cholesterol levels under 200mg/dL (5.2 mmol/L). However, the ideal cholesterol range varies based on your health, age, and other risk factors.

People who have diabetes, heart disease, or hypertension typically aim for a cholesterol level below 100mg/dL (2.6 mmol/L). As you know, the body makes cholesterol and uses it to make hormones and build cell membranes.

It’s also used to make bile, which helps with digestion. A small amount of cholesterol is also found in our blood. In fact, the average adult has about 3,500mg of cholesterol in their blood. The body makes more cholesterol when needed and releases it when it’s not needed.

Why Some People Are Concerned About Cholesterol on Keto

There are two types of cholesterol: LDL and HDL. LDL is the bad type that can build up in arteries, clog them, and cause heart disease.

HDL is the good type that can keep LDL from building up. A ketogenic diet can have positive effects on cholesterol. Eating a high-fat diet can lower triglycerides and raise HDL (the good) cholesterol.

It can also decrease LDL cholesterol, but it doesn’t always happen. Some factors like genetics, age, and lifestyle can influence the effect of this diet on cholesterol. People who have high cholesterol levels or are at risk for heart disease may be concerned about how a ketogenic diet will affect their numbers.

In general, eating a high-fat diet can lower triglycerides and raise HDL (the good) cholesterol. It can also decrease LDL cholesterol, but it doesn’t always happen.

How to Reduce Cholesterol on a Ketogenic Diet

If you want to reduce cholesterol on a ketogenic diet, then you should do the following: Make sure you’re eating enough fat. For some people, eating a high-fat diet can lower LDL cholesterol, but for others it may not.

If you’ve been eating keto for a while and your cholesterol levels haven’t changed, then you may need to make a few tweaks to your diet. Eating a varied diet is key to keeping your cholesterol in a healthy range.

Some foods are better for cholesterol than others. Nuts, seeds, fish, avocados, and coconut oil are all good choices for people on a ketogenic diet. Be mindful of how much saturated fat you’re eating. Saturated fats are found in animal products like meat, dairy, and eggs. The ideal is to get less than 10% of your calories from saturated fats.

Foods That Help Reduce Cholesterol on Keto

There are many foods that can help lower cholesterol on a ketogenic diet. Here are a few of them:

  • Nuts and seeds – Nuts and seeds are great low-carb sources of protein. They’re also high in monounsaturated fats, which can lower cholesterol.
  • Fish – Fatty fish like salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, and trout are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower triglycerides.
  • Avocado – This fruit is high in healthy fats that can help lower cholesterol.
  • Coconut oil – This oil is rich in lauric acid, which can lower cholesterol.
  • Ghee – This is a type of clarified butter that’s high in butyrate and can lower cholesterol.

Final Words

If you’re concerned about your cholesterol levels, then eating a ketogenic diet can help. This diet is high in fat and low in carbs, so you’re more likely to improve your lipid profile. To reduce cholesterol on a ketogenic diet, make sure you’re eating enough fat, avoiding saturated fats, and eating lots of fiber, healthy fats, and other nutritious foods.